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on the impact the fiscal cliff would have on americans at home. secretary of state clinton is warning not eaching a budget deal would have an impact on global economy global security. she gave a speech at the brookings institute yesterday and said she's hearing concerns from other countries about the choices we're making when it comes to the economy and it's essential that lawmakers in washington make a meaningful deal. we're back after the break. stay with us. i want to have that conversation. let's talk about it. really? you're going to lay people off because now the government is going to help you fund your healthcare. really? i want to have those conversations, not to be confrontational, but to understand what the other side is saying, and i'd like to arm our viewers with the ability to argue with their conservative uncle joe over the dinner table. [ female announcer ] what would you call an ordinary breakfast pastry that's been wrapped in a flaky crust stuffed with a gooey center toasted up all golden brown then given a delicious design? a toaster strudel. pi
americans sent us to do. >> you mentioned the fiscal cliff and i want to ask you about it. president obama even in his p - proposal yesterday had entitlement cuts including to medicare. you have in the past been resistant to cutting entit entitlements. does the result of the election -- i've heard many people on the democratic side say, look, we won. we don't need to make concess n concessions to republicans on entitlements. we can raise the top rates without making these concessions. do you think the president is even in this first proposal giving away too much on the entitlement side? >> i think it's important to note that there's a difference between working to cut medicare and protecting the benefits. and itch said repeatedly that i will not vote to cut the benefits people have earned and depend on because they put those benefits into place, one, this in the middle of a depression, social security, and the other one, medicare, because they were needed. republicans and democrats recognized they needed these programs because people got old and people got sick and they still do. so i wi
with both parties to find common ground. solving the fiscal cliff in a that addresses the true drivers of our debt and saves american jobs will be a great way for the president to start his second term and for the good of our country and my colleagues, we're ready to work with the president to achieve those goals. >> mr. speaker, a couple of things. first, on the issue of tax rates, are you willing to accept no deal that includes some increase in the top tax rates? and i'm also wondering, what our final deadline is on this. >> increasing tax rates draws money away from our economy that needs to be invested in our economy to put the american people back to work. it's the wrong approach. we're willing to put revenues on the table but revenues that come from closing loopholes, getting rid of special interest deduckses and not raising rates we think is better for the economy, pure and simple. secondly, the american people expect us to find common ground, to work together and to resolve this and frankly sooner is better than later. >> you've been doing this for a long time. can you be candi
-called fiscal cliff is a solvable problem. critical as the holidays approach and businesses make investment and hiring decisions for next year. while polls show many americans are pessimistic, there's optimism in this home. >> i got a sense that he's confident that what's best for the american people will happen. >> yeah. >> reporter: you agree? >> yes. >> i do too. >> reporter: but for now, the gop's resisting any tax increases even on those upper income americans. house republicans of course have made the counteroffer with $800 billion in new revenue and an overhaul of the tax code. wolf, they feel as if they have moved the ball, but they don't believe that the president is interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> these negotiations, dan, they usually go until the bitter, bitter end. a lot of folks are assuming that before that end there will be a deal. give us a flavor of the mood at the white house. >> reporter: well, i think they're preparing for this fiscal cliff scenario to play out, wolf. but as you point out when we look back over the last three years, we've had these kinds of n
of going over the fiscal cliff -- republicans are going to have to abrogate that pledge. it is not conservatism bound to 35% tax rate. that is not one of the and mutable principles of american conservatism. we want taxes to be as low as they can possibly be while running a government that is not bankrupt and in structural deficit for as far as the eye can see. you will have to see republican leaders step up here and meet the president's somewhere in the middle on this to get the country's fiscal path on a path to solvency so we can start to have economic growth again in the country. >> do you want to comment a little bit about what you expect from the next six weeks? not even six weeks? however many weeks it is now between -- between now and the start of this booklet. working in the white house limits what you can say, but how you see his plan at between now and january? >> steve is exactly right, all the you are seeing a very concerted members of the house dig in on a no revenues. it is good to see many republicans saying yes. i cannot get into a lot of details -- i thi
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)